Idea Of The “american Dream” In A Raisin In The Sun By Lorraine Hansberry

These ideas and dreams have turned this content into delusions, which have grown out of control causing damage to his sister Beneatha and others around him. In this scene, she is the only one aware of their current living situation. Walter’s reaction towards Ruth is to portray a dominant and breadwinning role in the family, so while he hands over the money to his son he stares at his wife to make an impression on them. Perhaps part of his dream is to be the sole breadwinner and top authority figure for his family, and he may also be acting this way because he wants his son to look up to him rather than someone else. He wants to set an example of being a man of the house write my essay, and doesn’t want to look inferior in front of his son.

  • However, this dream may take many different forms for many different people.
  • When the family is united in the end by the last dream, it is realized that a natural phenomenon, a dream, really does control the outcome.
  • In the 1950s, civil rights went from being a generally southern issue, to being a national concern.
  • However, the story is set between the years of 1900 and 1918, the last four of which would have occurred during the First World War.

Walter sometimes drinks too much and is less mature emotionally when compared to other members of his family, as seen in his embrace of self-pity and the tendency to blame outside forces for his own shortcomings. He also struggles with the oppression from within his own family; his mother’s reluctance to share the insurance money so that Walter can invest in a liquor store is seen by him as a great injustice. Despite the more leveled-headed example of his wife, Ruth, Walter is forced to address his issues through the course of the play and, as a result, grows into a mature, more focused man. At the beginning of the play, Walter Lee and Beneatha’s father has recently died, and Mama is waiting for a life insurance check for $10,000. Walter has a sense of entitlement to the money, but Mama has religious objections to alcohol, and Beneatha has to remind him it is Mama’s call how to spend it.

Twentieth Century American Family Literature: A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, And A Raisin In The Sun

She used the dialect of the African American community that is not only distinct but also pure. The characters speak in their domestic setting and individual style as Beneatha and Asagai show their superior and formal education even in everyday conversation, while Mama, Mrs. Johnson, and Ruth demonstrate their crude language. The diction and tone of the play, too, suit the community, neighborhood as well as main audience. Lorraine mostly turns to irony, sarcasm, and other devices of figurative language to make her dialogs effective. Beneatha also adds to the family problems by rejecting George Murchison and accepting Joseph Asagai who wants her to complete her medical education first. During the breakup with Beneatha, George says that he didn’t show interest in her because they could talk about ‘quiet desperation.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

Mama points out that something has come between her and her children and Walter notes the same is happening between him and Ruth. These divisions are only seen to be overcome at the end of the play when they finally, and jointly, agree to move to Clybourne Park with pride. Their unity is seen to transcend the barriers and this becomes a weapon to challenge the divisive effects of poverty and inherent racism. Oftentimes, seemingly minor characters can actually have great significance to either the meaning or the actions of the play. InA Raisin in the Sunthere is a handful of minor characters, including George and Joseph, who are significant to the play. Choose one or more of the minor characters inA Raisin in the Sunand write an essay in which you analyze the roles that they play in the development of the thematic content ofA Raisin in the Sun.

Lorraine Hansberrys A Raisin In The Sun

Unlike many of her black contemporaries, Lorraine Hansberry grew up in a family that was well aware of its African heritage, and embraced its roots. Hansberry’s afrocentrism is expressed mainly through Beneatha’s love for Asagai. Asagai, a Nigerian native, is who Beneatha seeks out during her search for her own identity. She is eager to learn about African culture, language, music, and dress. The playwright is well ahead of her times in her creation of these characters.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

By thinking big, they refuse to be the raisins in the sun of Langston Hughes’ poem (‘Montage of a Dream Deferred’). Read Jason Reynold’s poem “For Everyone”, and in a personal response to the play and the poem, create a poem depicting thoughts, feelings, and insights about dreams. Raisin In The SunRaisin In The Sun The action of the play takes place in the poor South side of Chicago, sometime after World War II, probably around 1959. Most of the action takes place in the apartment of the Youngers, especially in the living/dining room and near the bathroom that they share with the Johnson family. Some of the action also takes place in the kitchen and in the two small bedrooms.

Essays On A Raisin In The Sun

Hansberry wants to express Walters emotions to create a deeper bond between audience and character. The audience can feel pity, sadness, anger, and fustration through Walter in Act 2 Scene 1. Walter in a way helps the audience release the emotions they have too and through Walters questions the audience and ask themselves and find out if this is the life they want. Walter’s dreams are prominent in the play as he is the main character whom the activities of the play revolve around.

Whether or not Ruth will actually decide on an abortion is debatable, for Ruth says to Mama in Act I, “Ain’t no thin’ can tear at you like losin’ your baby.” Ruth says this as Mama is recounting the pain of having lost her own baby, Claude. At this point in the play, Ruth’s pregnancy has not yet been verified, but the dialogue spawned by the abortion controversy in this drama is as relevant today as it was in 1959, when the play opened. She is different from Lena in that she vocalizes her frustrations with her spouse, Walter.

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